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How Photographic Film Works

Some of you may know this. Some of you may not. But here’s something interesting: nowadays, cameras are everywhere, as in, just about everyone has one in their pocket. Sure, digital cameras are just counting photons hitting some silicon. But, before that? We had film. Film that recorded photos physically with chemical changes. And, I personally find that the science behind that is rather fascinating.

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WebDAV Explained: Filesystems Over HTTP

So I take it some people reading this are familiar with what I’ll call a ‘remote filesystem protocol’ like NFS, SMB, or AFP. Well, did you know there’s one that’s found use in a few places and you’ve maybe heard of once or twice, and really… well, doesn’t sound like it should make any sense? Welcome to WebDAV. The remote filesystem that runs over HTTP.

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My Next Obsolete Hobby: Film Photography

So here’s the thing. Compared to my other camera, the Nikon D7000, what I just bought is a 100% complete downgrade. However, I cannot resist the possibility of experiencing an era that had more or less ended before I was born. So, what did I do? I bought a 39 year old Nikon FG, which takes… 35mm film. But I won’t be stopping at just taking pictures… you’ll see shortly ;)

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IRC Is an Insanely Simple Protocol

This is where I’d usually make some joke about “if you remember, back in the day…” but… given how Freenode and Libera have been in the news recently for Freenode’s rather hostile takeover (and suicide), You probably know what IRC is. So. IRC, or Internet Relay Chat, is a really old (as in, 1988) protocol for text-based communications between users on a network. And the cool part is, it’s so simple that it’s almost funny. Like, let’s take a look. You could actually, with only a few minutes of reading, just enter raw IRC protocol lines by hand and have a perfectly valid and functional session.

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Matrix: Decentralized, Federated Chat

Do you like secure chat apps? but actually secure, not like Telegram? And end-to-end encrypted, if selected? And ones that support sending media, and files, and even voice and video calls? And completely decentralized meaning you don’t need to rely on any one company or any one third-party server?

Well do I have a deal for you: Matrix.

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Doing What Markdown Can't: Specifying Image Width and Height

By default, the Markdown renderer in Hugo, at this point in time, is Goldmark, a CommonMark compliant renderer. CommonMark makes no provisions for manually specifying the width or height of an image. There’s various extensions, like those for Pandoc, Kramdown, and GFM, but Goldmark doesn’t support those. Google is getting a little cranky with the amount of CLS on some pages, especially on mobile, so it’s a good idea for me to start specifying sizes for most images. How should I do this? By hacking it on as a feature that is in no way the intended use for anything involved.

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Detailed Images, With No Shortcodes

If you remember when I first added the Medium Zoom library, I wasn’t using one of its features: the ability to load a larger image when the user clicks to zoom in, only when the user wants to zoom in. However, I added this later, and in that, the method I used was to use a Hugo shortcode to include the image with proper attributes in the <img> tag. Well as it turns out, I don’t need to do this. Now, I can have that happen automatically with standard Markdown ![image links]().

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Giving My Sitemap Some Style

Now I know I’ve talked about sitemap.xml before, but quick summary: that’s an XML file that has a list of every (public) URL on your site, to make it easier for crawlers to index your entire site since that list (or, map) lays it out. Well as an XML file, it can take XML style sheets, in a format called XSLT, short for XSL Transformations, short for eXtensible Stylesheet Language. Yes, it’s XML all the way down. But, if you’ve looked at my sitemap, you’ll see I’ve gone and done it. This is how.

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Graylog, and the Syslog Protocol, Explained

So if you’ve tried enterprise log management systems, you’ve likely heard of Syslog. If you haven’t, Syslog, is, well, a protocol designed to allow multiple hosts to send their system logs over the network to some other server where they can be analyzed and stored. It’s another one of those weird UDP protocols, and this one is actually stupid simple, even in both of the commonly used forms! Oh, we’ll also cover the one piece of software that I use that handles Syslog — Graylog, which by itself is also really cool.

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